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  • How do you do?
    I'm Jamie; an incurably-curious, hopelessly-idealistic, vegetarian, polyglot-ish plant scientist at Cambridge. I spend too much time listening to music, wandering around the countryside, and eating apples.


    penchants: forest walks, benjamin britten, mediaeval history & literature, eastern philosophy, obscure tea blends, copperplate, twilight by the sea, quantum mechanics, thunderstorms, fruit trees, early music, dragonflies, postcards, underground railways, gardening, vapour trails, tiny art galleries, volcanic islands, moths, Virginia Woolf, gin cocktails, travel journals, mountain air, handwriting, continental cinema, bow ties, Lebanese food, historical linguistics, archery, all things Icelandic, & bitter-sweet lemonade.
    Thank you for stopping by; do say hello.

    Dr Alex Webb introduced his talk by outlining the problems that organisms face on a planet that spins on a (tilted) axis. Thank goodness for the circadian clock… He described the work that his lab has carried out over the last year or two, looking at the rôle of endogenous sucrose levels (which build up as a result of light-driven photosynthetic activity commencing with the photoperiod) in defining a ‘metabolic dawn’ that entrains the clock circuitry separately from the ‘physical dawn’.
He also briefly spoke about his other project on cell-type- and stimulus-specific oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+. It turns out that adding NaCl to the roots of Arabidopsis plants results in a detectable change in the profile of calcium oscillations in the guard cells of the leaf almost instantaneously, suggesting that a long-distance signal- perhaps electrical- is at work.

    Dr Alex Webb introduced his talk by outlining the problems that organisms face on a planet that spins on a (tilted) axis. Thank goodness for the circadian clock… He described the work that his lab has carried out over the last year or two, looking at the rĂ´le of endogenous sucrose levels (which build up as a result of light-driven photosynthetic activity commencing with the photoperiod) in defining a ‘metabolic dawn’ that entrains the clock circuitry separately from the ‘physical dawn’.

    He also briefly spoke about his other project on cell-type- and stimulus-specific oscillations of cytosolic Ca2+. It turns out that adding NaCl to the roots of Arabidopsis plants results in a detectable change in the profile of calcium oscillations in the guard cells of the leaf almost instantaneously, suggesting that a long-distance signal- perhaps electrical- is at work.

    9 months ago

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