oak apples.


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  • How do you do?
    I'm Jamie; an incurably-curious, hopelessly-idealistic, vegetarian, polyglot-ish plant scientist at Cambridge. I spend too much time listening to music, wandering around the countryside, and eating apples.


    penchants: forest walks, benjamin britten, mediaeval history & literature, eastern philosophy, obscure tea blends, copperplate, twilight by the sea, quantum mechanics, thunderstorms, fruit trees, early music, dragonflies, postcards, underground railways, gardening, vapour trails, tiny art galleries, volcanic islands, moths, Virginia Woolf, gin cocktails, travel journals, mountain air, handwriting, continental cinema, bow ties, Lebanese food, historical linguistics, archery, all things Icelandic, & bitter-sweet lemonade.
    Thank you for stopping by; do say hello.

    A William Morris tapestry incorporating grapevines and cabbages. To the Ancient Greeks this was an unthinkable combination- didn’t everybody know that vines and cabbages hated each other? (Which, incidentally, is why cabbage was recommended by many classical authors as a cure or a preventative for hangovers!) In fact, many plants were supposed to either harbour sympathetic or antipathetic feelings towards each other.
This afternoon I went to a seminar at the Department of the History and Philosophy of Science about the anthropomorphising of the vegetable kingdom in classical natural philosophy and literature. Of particular interest to me was the discussion of treatments of pollination events by Greek and Roman authors, who often described the reproductive processes of plants- whilst not comprehending the details- in terms of lovesick yearning followed by romantic fulfilment.

    A William Morris tapestry incorporating grapevines and cabbages. To the Ancient Greeks this was an unthinkable combination- didn’t everybody know that vines and cabbages hated each other? (Which, incidentally, is why cabbage was recommended by many classical authors as a cure or a preventative for hangovers!) In fact, many plants were supposed to either harbour sympathetic or antipathetic feelings towards each other.

    This afternoon I went to a seminar at the Department of the History and Philosophy of Science about the anthropomorphising of the vegetable kingdom in classical natural philosophy and literature. Of particular interest to me was the discussion of treatments of pollination events by Greek and Roman authors, who often described the reproductive processes of plants- whilst not comprehending the details- in terms of lovesick yearning followed by romantic fulfilment.

    11 months ago

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      A William Morris tapestry incorporating grapevines and cabbages. To the Ancient Greeks this was an unthinkable...
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      I wanna go that panel like you wouldn’t believe omfg
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