oak apples.


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  • How do you do?
    I'm Jamie; an incurably-curious, hopelessly-idealistic, vegetarian, polyglot-ish plant scientist at Cambridge. I spend too much time listening to music, wandering around the countryside, and eating apples.


    penchants: forest walks, benjamin britten, mediaeval history & literature, eastern philosophy, obscure tea blends, copperplate, twilight by the sea, quantum mechanics, thunderstorms, fruit trees, early music, dragonflies, postcards, underground railways, gardening, vapour trails, tiny art galleries, volcanic islands, moths, Virginia Woolf, gin cocktails, travel journals, mountain air, handwriting, continental cinema, bow ties, Lebanese food, historical linguistics, archery, all things Icelandic, & bitter-sweet lemonade.
    Thank you for stopping by; do say hello.

    I’ve been feeling even more in love than usual with all things botanical today, which has led me to spend an awfully long time perusing SEM images of plant tissues…
I thought I’d share this simple little picture in particular because I know several people who, having always thought of plants as dull, inanimate objects, suddenly became interested in them on seeing images like this. I think it’s because stomata- the pores that plants use to exchange gases across their surfaces- are not just fascinating physiological and morphological phenomena in themselves; they are, in human terms, the plant’s mouth, one of its key links with the atmosphere and the big, bad world. In a sense, they therefore represent a very humanising trait; who could fail to sympathise and feel engaged with these fragile yet persistent creatures after having watched them use these beautiful structures quietly to breathe the very same air as we do?

    I’ve been feeling even more in love than usual with all things botanical today, which has led me to spend an awfully long time perusing SEM images of plant tissues…

    I thought I’d share this simple little picture in particular because I know several people who, having always thought of plants as dull, inanimate objects, suddenly became interested in them on seeing images like this. I think it’s because stomata- the pores that plants use to exchange gases across their surfaces- are not just fascinating physiological and morphological phenomena in themselves; they are, in human terms, the plant’s mouth, one of its key links with the atmosphere and the big, bad world. In a sense, they therefore represent a very humanising trait; who could fail to sympathise and feel engaged with these fragile yet persistent creatures after having watched them use these beautiful structures quietly to breathe the very same air as we do?

    10 months ago

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