oak apples.


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  • How do you do?
    I'm Jamie; an incurably-curious, hopelessly-idealistic, vegetarian, polyglot-ish plant scientist at Cambridge. I spend too much time listening to music, wandering around the countryside, and eating apples.


    penchants: forest walks, benjamin britten, mediaeval history & literature, eastern philosophy, obscure tea blends, copperplate, twilight by the sea, quantum mechanics, thunderstorms, fruit trees, early music, dragonflies, postcards, underground railways, gardening, vapour trails, tiny art galleries, volcanic islands, moths, Virginia Woolf, gin cocktails, travel journals, mountain air, handwriting, continental cinema, bow ties, Lebanese food, historical linguistics, archery, all things Icelandic, & bitter-sweet lemonade.
    Thank you for stopping by; do say hello.

    In response to the comment: it depends on your take on the taxonomy of Convallaria. It is generally treated as a monospecific genus, in which case this can only be C. majalis. There are, however, three subspecies, and a number of cultivars which are differentiated on the basis of floral morphology. Perhaps it is hard to tell from this photograph, but this individual is definitely C. majalis ssp. majalis, and the inflorescence does indeed ‘droop’ in the graceful way you describe. :) I suspect that the ‘drooping’ will become more pronounced as the inflorescence and individual flowers mature.
Another thought: it may look a little different from how it does in the wild (perhaps a bit skotomorphic?) because it’s been forced in mid-winter.

    In response to the comment: it depends on your take on the taxonomy of Convallaria. It is generally treated as a monospecific genus, in which case this can only be C. majalis. There are, however, three subspecies, and a number of cultivars which are differentiated on the basis of floral morphology. Perhaps it is hard to tell from this photograph, but this individual is definitely C. majalis ssp. majalis, and the inflorescence does indeed ‘droop’ in the graceful way you describe. :) I suspect that the ‘drooping’ will become more pronounced as the inflorescence and individual flowers mature.

    Another thought: it may look a little different from how it does in the wild (perhaps a bit skotomorphic?) because it’s been forced in mid-winter.

    1 year ago

    1. dreamsofdawn said: Are you sure this is majalis? Because the kind that grows widely in Finland looks very different, much more graceful, with the flowers drooping only on the other side of the stem.
    2. oakapples posted this