oak apples.


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  • How do you do?
    I'm Jamie; an incurably-curious, hopelessly-idealistic, vegetarian, polyglot-ish plant scientist at Cambridge. I spend too much time listening to music, wandering around the countryside, and eating apples.


    penchants: forest walks, benjamin britten, mediaeval history & literature, eastern philosophy, obscure tea blends, copperplate, twilight by the sea, quantum mechanics, thunderstorms, fruit trees, early music, dragonflies, postcards, underground railways, gardening, vapour trails, tiny art galleries, volcanic islands, moths, Virginia Woolf, gin cocktails, travel journals, mountain air, handwriting, continental cinema, bow ties, Lebanese food, historical linguistics, archery, all things Icelandic, & bitter-sweet lemonade.
    Thank you for stopping by; do say hello.

    When I went to the Post Office this afternoon, the man just ahead of me in the queue was sending a package to Garðabær in Iceland. Wish I could have squeezed into it.

    the fallow deer at the lonely house

    One without looks in to-night
    Through the curtain-chink
    From the sheet of glistening white;
    One without looks in to-night
    As we sit and think
    By the fender-brink.

    We do not discern those eyes
    Watching in the snow;
    Lit by lamps of rosy dyes
    We do not discern those eyes
    Wondering, aglow,
    Fourfooted, tiptoe.

    - Thomas Hardy (1840-1928)

    Reading up on the natural history of New Zealand’s Auckland Islands- the so-called Galápagos of the Southern Ocean. (That endemic Gentianella is 100% botanical smut.)

    Bones in the 5-acre pit of La Pineta at Isernia, Italy. This enormous Palaeolithic dump (?) recently played host to the discovery of a 586,000-year-old hominin milk-tooth.

    Bones in the 5-acre pit of La Pineta at Isernia, Italy. This enormous Palaeolithic dump (?) recently played host to the discovery of a 586,000-year-old hominin milk-tooth.

    Koenigia islandica, one of the most extraordinary plants in the word.

    Koenigia islandica, one of the most extraordinary plants in the word.

    Anonymous said: I have a mountain in my pants *wink wink* *hint hint*

    Oh dear. I’d advise you to seek medical assistance.

    I need mountains.

    Just discovered that a house in Hammersmith, London, belonging at the time of the 1911 census to my lowly great-great-grandparents (he from Norfolk, she born in India) is now worth around £1.7 million. Talk about property bubbles.

    Anonymous said: How old r u?

    22.

    Anonymous said: You shd come to Singapore...orchid is our national flower n u can study them :)

    I would love to visit- perhaps when I’m next on my way to Australia (hopefully in 2015). There is a distinct possibility that I may one day end up working on orchid evolution as part of a project that would definitely require me to make use of the fabulous herbarium and living collection material available in Singapore, anyway. :)