oak apples.


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  • How do you do?
    I'm Jamie; an incurably-curious, hopelessly-idealistic, vegetarian, polyglot-ish plant scientist at Cambridge. I spend too much time listening to music, wandering around the countryside, and eating apples.


    penchants: forest walks, benjamin britten, mediaeval history & literature, eastern philosophy, obscure tea blends, copperplate, twilight by the sea, quantum mechanics, thunderstorms, fruit trees, early music, dragonflies, postcards, underground railways, gardening, vapour trails, tiny art galleries, volcanic islands, moths, Virginia Woolf, gin cocktails, travel journals, mountain air, handwriting, continental cinema, bow ties, Lebanese food, historical linguistics, archery, all things Icelandic, & bitter-sweet lemonade.
    Thank you for stopping by; do say hello.

    (Source: Spotify)

    For my birthday, since I can’t keep my own at the moment, my mum adopted a hive of honeybees in the English Midlands for me. :)
Photo: Wikipedia.

    For my birthday, since I can’t keep my own at the moment, my mum adopted a hive of honeybees in the English Midlands for me. :)

    Photo: Wikipedia.

    Spotted this lovely forest of Marchantia polymorpha on the walk home this evening.

    Spotted this lovely forest of Marchantia polymorpha on the walk home this evening.

    Traditional houses (known as ‘blackhouses’) on the Hebridean island of Mingulay, 1905. Seven years after this photo was taken, the last few families still living on Mingulay were evacuated to the Scottish mainland.
Photo: intarch.ac.uk

    Traditional houses (known as ‘blackhouses’) on the Hebridean island of Mingulay, 1905. Seven years after this photo was taken, the last few families still living on Mingulay were evacuated to the Scottish mainland.

    Photo: intarch.ac.uk

    Axinaea affinis (Melastomataceae). A paper just out in Current Biology describes for the first time the unique pollination biology of this Neotropical genus. The inflated, berry-like stamens attract various passerine birds, which peck away at them and thereby release a puff of pollen that coats the flower’s stigma, leading to successful fertilisation.

    Axinaea affinis (Melastomataceae). A paper┬ájust out in Current Biology describes for the first time the unique pollination biology of this Neotropical genus. The inflated, berry-like stamens attract various passerine birds, which peck away at them and thereby release a puff of pollen that coats the flower’s stigma, leading to successful fertilisation.

    Another plea to amateur UK naturalists: be sure to take part in this year’s Big Butterfly Count, which continues until 10th August. Pictured is the Camberwell Beauty, Nymphalis antiopa, a rare migrant on our island.
Photo: lepiforum.de

    Another plea to amateur UK naturalists: be sure to take part in this year’s Big Butterfly Count, which continues until 10th August. Pictured is the Camberwell Beauty, Nymphalis antiopa, a rare migrant on our island.

    Photo: lepiforum.de

    St Peter’s, Horningsea.

    One of the most timelessly beautiful places I know.